Merry Christmas to all

The Bennetts of Alhambra

The Bennetts of Alhambra

This photo card might be pushing into the 60s, it just has that look. The card is pink and features three boys in ornament shapes. The family was Marion and Walter, Scott, Jim and Jerry Bennett.

Greetings from our house

The Hans kids

The Hans kids

You may not recognize them, but the older two children in this photo are the same two who were posed at the piano the other day. The family has expanded by one and we now know their last name – The Hans. Judy previously played the piano while Jimmy is now called Jim, and little Harry has joined the clan.

Merry Christmas

Giddy-up!

Giddy-up!

Merry Christmas Happy New Year from The Mullins. A nice note was on the back.

Christmas Pix 9

The younger generation

Yes, these are the “younger generation” Mullins. Sure makes us feel old when we see how big they re getting. We moved to the country last summer and are very happy about tit. The children have their pets, I (Maurene) have peace & quiet – and all Jay has is a long ride to work & back. He’s still doing construction work – working on a power house right now.

Do you ever hear anything from any of the old Navy gang? Write.

Sincerely, The Mullins

 

Greetings

Now, hold still kiddies

Now, hold still kiddies

A girl and boy sit on a carpet covered with gigantic leaves. Greetings from our house to your house says the card, and it was signed Joe, Bette, Barbie and Stevie.

Season’s Greetings

Carols at the piano

Carols at the piano

Two sweet children at the piano, with little Judy playing a chord. The card was addressed To Aunt Agie and Uncle Jan. The beautiful penmanship reveals the family who set it was Evelyn and Harry, Judy and Jimmy.

The back side reveals a note:

Please do us a favor

Please do us a favor

Dear All -

Merry Christmas! I’m sending Vera and Dirk’s card in care of you as we couldn’t remember how to spell their last name. I hope they don’t mind.

With love,

Evelyn and Harry

Best wishes for a Merry Christmas

Cute boy

Cute boy

Jumping forward to the 1950s, when these photo Christmas cards really became popular, we see Bobby posed to look up into the face of the future. His parents were Evelyn and Walter.

Christmas would always be welcome

Golden bells

Golden bells

This is an interesting collection of items. The folded vellum card looks like a book and features golden bells and embossed holly detail. The items below were all folded into the card and paperclipped together.

Sweet greeting

Sweet greeting

The greeting reads:

Christmas would / always be welcome / if only because it / gives us a chance / to greet again, good / friends with whom, / somehow, we’ve gotten / out of touch

The inserts consist of three landscapes and a newspaper clipping of a poem.

Newspaper clipping

Newspaper clipping

From the Just Folks column by Edgar A. Guest. Guest was a well known poet popular in America for more than 40 years. His first published poem appeared in the Detroit Free Press in 1898. He was featured as a syndicated column in 300 or so newspapers, had a radio program and even a television series in the early 1950s. A collection of his works published in 1917 was titled Just Folks, and over his career he wrote some 11,000 poems.

The Gardener’s Task

In March I cut the roses back

Which took me years to learn;

I’d not in me the will to be

So ruthless and so stern;

And loving all the growing canes

I left them standing tall.

Unwise was I, for June went by

With scarce a rose at all.

 

I loved not wisely, but too well.

On many a stem I smiled.

To pruning loath I watched the growth

Of thorny shoots and wild.

I thought it tenderness to let

The seven-leafed branches stay

And didn’t know when wild stalks grow

They must be cut away.

 

Last March I cut the roses back

And bade them start anew.

With knife severe I stripped them clear

Of every growth untrue.

Now every branch a promise bears

Of roses soon to be,

And strives to tell in buds that swell

Its gratitude to me.

Copyright 1908

Copyright 1908

Winter scene

Winter scene

Winter tree

Winter tree

None of the landscapes have any notes or messages written on them. Based on the one forest scene having a copyright date in 1908, I’m guessing these are items someone had and they reminded them of home. The illustrations and poem may have been sent with the card, or intended to be mailed with the card, but then never mailed. We can never know, but the paperclips were very rusty, so these things have been together for a long, long time.

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