Side eye

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I just love this little image! The square-ish card mount is approximately 2.5″x2.5″, and the photo is mounted to the back, with a thin paper covering the back of the photo. The woman at first glance just looks the “usual” stern of antique photos. However, when you look closely, she must have glanced over at the photographer because her eyes are not tracking off the the right, but looking back at the viewer, and it makes it look like she is giving the side eye. Too funny!

Beyond that, take note of the lovely small tucks across her bodice. This work was sometimes done by hand, but there were also fabrics made with tucks in them. If it was done by hand, it’s beautiful but tedious to accomplish. The tucks – if sewn by hand – would be small and precise, with tiny stitches that could barely be seen. Hand sewing is truly becoming a lost art, because it takes much practice and sometimes better materials than we have readily available to us today. The dropped puffed sleeves of this garment suggest late 1890s or early 1900s, but without more of the dress I can’t make a better guess.

Her crowning glory of a hat has bows, flowers and feathers I believe, and looks like an amazing millinery confection. I wonder how on trend this type of hat was, or if it was just that old thing?

Bruce D McSparrow

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One of these lads is Bruce D. McSparrow. Due to some home construction, I have packed these photographs away and I’m not sure which one of these had the writing on the back! Whoops. I also had it carefully labeled on the original file, but my computer is also packed away. Fooey.

Bruce was 7 years old at the time of the photo, September 3, 1897. These two photographs are small, only about 3″ x 4″ with the image centered in the card.

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They were accompanied by their mother, previously shown in this post. As it turns out, this is identified on the back as Mrs. S. M. McSparrow.

Streeter Family Overview

I have made significant updates to the Streeter Family Overview, which may interest some of you. Of note, Kate Parish’s death and funeral information, and obituaries for Flora Moses.

Who Were They?

This tiny photograph is the last photo from the C. Murray Album, and was tucked into the corner of a page, almost as an afterthought, though I like to really think it was so small it just didn’t fit into any of the other album slots. It was tucked in with the photo which I entitled Granny and her Grands, so I wonder if she is the girl in the photo. The photo itself is only about 1 1/5″ by 1 3/4″ and is on flimsy paper. I don’t know the era those types of photos came from; it looks to be a print of a glass plate or something similar.

Following is my summary of everything I know about the Streeter family. I am blessed to have been connected with Intense Guy, Far Side of Fifty, CatM, and a couple of people on Ancestry.com who had other bits and…

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Stern face, pretty lace

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This fine Edwardian era photograph features a middle aged woman with a stern face. Her hair is twisted up on top of her head in a style popular in the early 20th century. Her high-necked dress has an embellishment of lace across the bodice and on the collar. Finally, there are six buttons front and center, which are probably non-functioning, meaning her bodice fastens in a different way. It is likely the dress has hooks & eyes, or less attractive workhorse buttons hidden by a placket.

The image is oval shaped in the center of the gray card. The card itself is about 3″ x 2″. I have two other photos that came with this one, and all were found in Tennessee.

UPDATE I forgot that this had been identified on the back as Mrs. S. M. McSparrow.

Merry Christmas with love

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The Collonade Club

There’s always that one card that arrives so late…! This card features a photograph of a beautiful building shaded by large trees. As it turns out, it is The Collonade Club at the University of Virginia.

This particular university is so important to American history because it was designed by Thomas Jefferson as an “academical village.” The cornerstone for this building was laid in 1807 by President James Madison, in the presence of Thomas Jefferson, in a Masonic ceremony. It’s an interesting story and I encourage you to read more about this beautiful building at the Collonade Club website.

The card was signed: Merry Christmas, with love for you and for all who may be gathered at your home for Christmas, Anne and Wallace.

On the back was transcribed the text on the bronze plaque at the Club. I can only imagine that Anne or Wallace or both were proud alumni of UVA.

Anne and Wallace

Anne and Wallace

Wishing you a happy New Year

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White flowers

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Pink flowers

The two sides of this card are similar to one another, and at first I didn’t realize there were two distinct images. But there are white flowers and pink flowers, both carrying the sentiment Wishing you a happy new year.

Again, there is no place to write a note and no makers mark. It is clearly a New Year’s card, which is much less common today than in the past, although I’m not so sure they were ever actually popular in history either.

A truly happy New Year to You

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May you have all the seasons joys

This card is far prettier in hand than on screen. It is a two sided affair, and pressed between the two cards is a fine silk fringe. Each side is similar to the other, with a pastoral scene surrounded by branches, and very fine white glitter on the snowy parts of the images which as all but worn off over time. There is no makers mark or place for someone to sign the card. I am guessing at the 1920s on this based on another card I have from around that same time that is somewhat similar, but it’s just a guess. Anyone with better knowledge, please do chime in!

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