Giant epaulettes

The best way I can describe the “wings” on this bodice is to call them epaulettes, although they really are not epaulettes. Epaulettes are the fancy fringed military insignia worn on the shoulder. They are most well known for decorating the impressive red jackets of 19th century military officers and in US military custom they were allowed to be left off the uniform during combat around 1868. I’d think the shiny gold fringe would be yet another target for a sharpshooter, so it was probably a good policy to institute.

This photograph from the Dobb Long Book is probably from the 1890s and was made by Frane & Bronson of Pekin, IL.

Advertisements

5 Comments (+add yours?)

  1. IntenseGuy
    Mar 15, 2011 @ 14:38:34

    Those shoulder wings will be making the Flying Nun jealous!

    Pekins, Illinois is a southwest suburb of Peoria.

    It seems like some of the Dobb family was in Peoria and some in Chicago – and perhaps some of them were in Michigan near Holland-Grand Haven-Muskegon.

    Reply

  2. IntenseGuy
    Mar 15, 2011 @ 18:11:47

    I’ve no luck with Bronson – but:

    United States Census, 1900 lists Charles C Frane (b. Jan 1869 in Illinois) residing in Vermont, Fulton, Illinois. Vermont is not far from Peoria.

    – and a couple photography trade magazine mentions –

    “CC Frane of Vermont, Illinois has opened a branch studio in Farmington. Mr. Frane has a very successful chain of studios throughout the northern part of Illinois. (Dec. 1912)”

    “WANTED Position as retoucher and finisher; operates same; samples if desired; ten year’s experience; references gilt edged; state wages in first letter permanent position wanted CC Frane, Vermont, Ill. (Nov. 1900)”

    Reply

  3. Far Side of Fifty
    Mar 16, 2011 @ 06:40:54

    Those are some wings..but you know it helps to ID a photo when you see them! This dress looks quite heavy..and the material looks warm no doubt a “winter” dress:)

    Reply

  4. Jess Becker
    Aug 29, 2011 @ 10:06:29

    I have several pictures of my family from the late 1800’s and early 1900’s that were taken by CC Frane! It’s nice to see others!

    Reply

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: