Handsome face

The unidentified subject of the CDV above has what could be considered a classically handsome face: strong jaw and mouth, slight mustache, straight nose, evenly spaced eyes, set into a well shaped face, not too wide & short, not to long and thin. His clothing appears to be nicely made, and while I don’t understand why his necktie looks like it is touching his bare neck in between the collar points, I do admire it’s pattern nonetheless. ┬áHis hair style is what caught my attention, though. What was once very popular and considered to be stylish is now an interesting “flip” of the hair on top, with some bushy fronds on the sides. It was probably oiled to death, too. He looks like he needs a wash, shave and a haircut, to me. But c’est la vie, he was probably considered to be just “the thing” to the ladies in his town!

The photographer of this paragon of the past was Stanley, of Lewiston, ME.

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Frazzled

SCENE – DRESSING ROOM – MISS LIZZIE DRESSING AND CONVERSING WITH LUCY, HER MAID

Lucy: Miss Lizzie, you have spent so much time on your dress and adornment, the corsage on your bodice is divine! You will look a picture of virtue and chastity for your wedding portrait.

Miss Lizzie: oh, thank you Lucy, your assistance with these balloon sleeves was crucial to getting them stuffed properly so they drape nicely and give me such an attractive figure.

Lucy: Yes, the silk can be tricky, but once you work with it you never want to make a dress of anything else again.

Miss Lizzie: Oh dear, Lucy, what shall I do with my hair?! I’ve got my sitting in half an hour at the photography studio and I just cannot think of a pretty way to dress it. What do you suggest?

Lucy: I suggest back combing the top and allowing small wisps to float attractively around your head, like a halo. You are such an angel, after all!

CURTAIN

You tell us, audience, did they accomplish their goal? Or does Miss Lizzie just look frazzled?

Baby Bad Hair Day

Continuing our bad hair day examples, this sweet baby had curly hair which made it difficult for her mama to dress it with any sort of style.  Her hair is wildly trying to escape whatever pomade or oil may have been used on it, and it just looks adorable.

Baby also is wearing a cross that looks giant on her, and knitted booties. I’m guessing she was around 10-12 months old, because she is sitting up very well and holding on to the chair for balance.

This photograph was made by Crosby, in Lewiston, but what country is unknown.

Bad Hair Day?

Up for review today is a CDV photograph from the 1860s. The child is solemn faced but hopefully after the photo was struck she perked up to a happier mein. I’m calling this item 1 in a series of “bad hair” photos to feature over the next few posts.

Her hair is wildly curly, but tamed enough for the center part which was important for identifying gender in children. Remember, these were the days when boys wore skirts for their first few years, so fashion trends dictated that boys had a side part while girls had a center part. This maybe came from adult fashions for hair styling. Her dress appears to have a small dot pattern or perhaps a pattern in the weave. You can see one growth tuck across the skirt and the hem looks to be 4-5 inches deep. Good for a growing girl! The sleeves are also quite loose and long on her. As well, the bodice is baggy to allow for a longer period of use.

The dresses for children buttoned in back. I believe this was a trick to keep young ones from undressing themselves and maybe it was held over to kinder aged children. If anyone knows the fashion history on this I’m very interested in commentary! Miss Curly Top is wearing a necklace with a large pendant on it. Maybe a family piece, or her first locket.

The photographer here was Rundlett Bros. Photographers in Watertown, WI. With the inclusion of cherubic baby photographers in their backmark, we can infer they specialized in children. Also of interest, the children are holding a portrait of a corseted woman. The front of the card has lovely red border lines, one thin, one thick. Combined with square corners on the card, this puts the date in the 1864-1869 range.

4 Similar Photos

Here’s a funny set of photos I received as part of a large lot. They were not together or in any sequence, just randomly found in the pack of 50 CDVs. But as I sorted them through, I realized these four photos have much in common. Can you catch all the similarities? I feel like this is one of those games where you spot the differences haha.

The hat in picture one and four is the same hat. It may be on the same lady, but the dress is different.

The necklace in photos two, three and four is the same. It has a very distinctive chain which made it stand out to me.

But what about the necklace in picture one? It may be the same locket on a different chain.

All four photos were made by Birtles of Northwich and Knutsford. The card backs are identical, suggesting they were made at least within the same year, if not during the same sitting.

What do you think? Are at least two of these faces the same? I think photo 3 is a young lady and one, two and four are her mother.

 

Two women from the 1860s

SD CDVs 4

This is a very nice mid to late 1860s image of two women. They appear to be mother & daughter. Note the lovely details:

  • Dropped shoulder seams with sleeve caps, and look at the trim on the standing woman!
  • The darker colored dress features a ribbon trim design at the sleeve cuff
  • Coat sleeves on both dresses to enhance the elbow area
  • Both women have some type of jewelry at the neck of her dress and the lady on the right looks to have a belt.
  • Fine, slicked back hair which was the fashion, parted in the center and dressed in back.
  • The standing woman is holding something in her hand, maybe a fan. She also has a wide band of trim at the hem of her dress.

As we know, colors did not photograph the same way they do today, so these dresses are quite likely beautiful colors and the one that appears lighter might actually be darker than the one that appears darker. I only wish we could see them in their true colors to appreciate the colors these ladies chose.

Fancy Hat

SD CDVs 8

Up for your perusal today is a lovely young couple from Devon who sat for their photograph in the late 1860s or even early 1870s. I think. I’m basing my assessment on the woman’s clothing as usual, and her dress seems to show a skirt that is elliptical, possibly trending toward the early bustle period, but not quite there. We do know that as skirts got bigger, hats got smaller and taller, to try to counterbalance the eye being drawn to the skirt. This skirt is fairly plain, but the bodice has some lovely trims and of course the hat is quite delicious. This young wife also has earrings, a large bow at her throat and a pin holding that in place. I wish we could know what colors her dress was!

I assume it is her husband seated, as this is a somewhat personal pose, with her hands on his shoulders. He is wearing some type of uniform, I think. The cap looks a bit like a conductor’s cap, so perhaps he worked on the trains. He’s also got a vest and a necktie to complete his costume.

The photographer was J. Grey at 60 Union Street, Stonehouse, Devon.

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