Pretty girl with hand tinting

SD CDVs 5

This is a beautiful image of a lovely little girl from the late 1860 time frame. I am targeting this date because one of the remaining corners of this card is clearly square. The rounded corner didn’t really become popularized until the 1870s. I say late 1860s because the image takes up the full card, which was more common post 1865. The card is badly damaged, I suspect by silverfish or other paper eating insects. The front and back of the card both show strange damage which looks a bit like how termites work their way through wood.

Our young lady is unfortunately quite washed out by the photographic process. We can’t know what color her dress was, and we can’t assume it was even white! I learned long ago that certain colors photographed as black, white and gray, even though they could have been yellow, blue and red! Thankfully the photographer tinted the sash and ribbon ties on the dress in a lovely light blue, added pink to her cheeks, and even colored the chair upholstery green and the wooden frame brown. She has lovely lace on the hem of her drawers and notice her shoes! They are quite high fashion.

The photo was made by R. Taylor at 16 Gt Ryrie Street, Geelong, Australia. I couldn’t find anything to explain what Gt would mean, but I am wondering if it means “great” as in “Great Ryrie Street.” I didn’t find any references to that street, however. There is a “Little Ryrie Street” so maybe Great Ryrie Street simply evolved into Ryrie Street. Ryrie Street is just a short walk from the water of Port Philip Bay. Geelong itself is near Clifton Springs and not too distant from Melbourne. Coincidentally, there is now an antique shop located at 16 Ryrie Street. As you can see in this picture, it’s in a very old building, and maybe it even housed the photography studio at one time. These kinds of connections are just fascinating to me.

Moorabool Antique Galleries, Geelong, Australia

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Ethnic Costume of Norway

SD CDVs

This wonderful cdv shows an ethnic costume from Norway. It has been carefully hand painted so as to bring out the navy colored breeches, green vest and red coat of the man, and the green, yellow and red decoration on the woman’s dress. The costumes are fascinating and were probably much more beautiful in person!

The photographer probably made a series of images of ethnic costumes, but this is the only painted image I came across during a recent trip to San Diego, CA. It does make me wonder how this particular cdv found its way from Sweden, where it was made, to almost the border between America and Mexico.I did a little bit of research on the costumes themselves and there is a rich and diverse ethnic costume tradition in Norway. These clothes could be wedding attire, as one website I found referenced women wearing a type of crown or headdress with their wedding clothes. The man’s costume looks similar to one I found from Sunnmøre in the southwestern part of the country. A person more familiar with the many regions and costumes of Norway can better pinpoint where these clothes were from.

The photographers were W. A. Eurenius & P. L. Quist of Stockholm. They were decorated photographers, with silver medals awarded them in 1865, 1866 and 1867. I have one other image from these photographers, also an ethnic costume. Come back soon and take a look.

Further Reading

Bunad – Norwegian Traditional Costumes – My Little Norway

A Cyclopedia of Costume or Dictionary of Dress by James Robinson Planche, Publisher William Clowes and Son, 1879, pp 344-348

A lady at Lovejoy’s

Mounted Tin Types 10 W

If only she could have smiled

Here is a second beautiful tintype made by C. L. Lovejoy in Philadelphia, PA. Lovejoy’s materials claimed the subject would be “Finished in Fifteen Minutes” a claim that modern photographers can hardly make even with digital processing. This particular image features the lovely embossed edging around the oval opening, showcasing the image preserved for our perusal some 150 years later. The corners of the card were again clipped, suggesting the card had squared corners, a more 1860’s trait.

The subject appears to have on small earrings and a ribbon choker. Her collar was a folded over affair made of lace, and she has a large bow tied at her throat. She may also have an oval brooch in the center of the bow. While her countenance does not appear to be anything other than ordinary, Lovejoy managed to add a bit of blush tinting to her cheeks, making her look a bit more welcoming than an untouched photo might imply.

 

Pink bow tie

Mounted Tin Types 7 W

Is this a repeat subject?

Mounted Tin Types 7 Back W

Lovejoy’s Studio mark

This tintype photograph looks remarkably like the fellow we saw back before the holidays, who had his portrait done by T. M. Saurman. The resemblance is strong, so it’s either the same man or his brother. This photograph features some hand tinting on the bowtie, making it pink. The backmark shows that this image was made at Lovejoy’s at 429 North Second Street, Above Willow, Philadelphia PA. I found a match to C. L. Lovejoy who was apparently known for his exquisite hand coloring work! He was known to be in business during the 1870s, however I must point out that the corners of this card have been cut and that is typical of 1860s cards. It is possible he bought these cards right at the end of the 60s or bought out old stock from another photographer. In January 1870, Lovejoy was the outgoing president of the Ferrotypers Association of Philadelphia – ferrotypes being another name for tintypes.

Check back again for another Lovejoy image next time!

 

Another possible Saurman?

Big bonnet

Big bonnet

Today’s photograph is a tintype in an embossed card holder virtually identical to the one of our previous baby. The only difference I can find – outside of the quality of the embossing – is that this paper sleeve has the mark “Patent Applied For” while the baby photo does not. This particular photo does not have the T. M. Saurman mark covering the back of the tintype, and so I cannot know for sure if that is who made it.

The woman in the photograph is showing off quite a lot of her finery. A wide collar, golden brooch, sheer shawl, fancy bonnet and a veil folded to the back. In the past, I would have immediately assumed the veil was indicative of mourning. However, in my recent exposure to some 19th century clothing experts, I learned that veils were worn as a type of sun block. The veil, often in black and dark green, muted the brightness of the sun and allowed the wearer to more comfortably walk in the sun. This veil appears to have some type of lace pattern on it. The dress, collar and bonnet all are 1850s fashions, but I believe this is an 1860s image. Whether it was reproduced after the fact (I don’t think so) or she liked these clothes (more likely) we cannot really know. It is a lovely image with fine hand tinting on her cheeks and the brooch is delicately gilded as well.

Family ties and mysteries

From time to time, I am asked by people to help identify photographs, even by finding a general date range. I am happy to do this when possible, although I cannot stress enough that I am not an expert and am simply sharing my general knowledge based on the research I do for this site. Recently I was contacted by site reader Jim Earl, who has a number of British CDVs and cabinet cards that pose a mystery to him. They are from his family’s photograph albums, but as with so many old photos, they were not identified at the time and now the subject names have been lost to the ages. But, because Jim’s photos are wonderful, I asked for, and he granted, permission to post them here for other reader input if any is to be had.

J Earl Beard

Quite a beard!

J Earl 1

Photographic artists Sandry & Burrow

Not much could be found on the photographer, Sandry and Burrow, except to expand the names as William James Sandry & Burrow. Sandry appears to have had a variety of partners and locations. The photo itself is a CDV of a gentleman who initially looks to be from the 1840s or 1850s to me. The squared corners of the card tell us this is most likely an 1860s image, and is possibly a reprint of a daguerrotype.

A woman and boy

A woman and boy

Another CDV made of a woman and boy, I am assuming a mother and son. Her dress is more characteristic of the 1870s, but his suit of clothes is suggestive of the 1860s. Another mystery photographer, A. Lloyd Beard from Cardiff. He made plenty of photos which are currently selling on sites like eBay, but no one seems to know when he was in business. I’m guessing at the late 1860s on this one.

Definitely 1860s here

Definitely 1860s here

This lovely image is definitely from the 1860s based on the wide hooped skirts of mother and child. The mother’s dress features a “false vest” style, which was a high-fashion look. The child has several rows of growth tucks and trim on her skirt. No photographer information was found on the photo.

J Earl Purple Bow

Fabulous hand painting

J Earl 2

Well, here is William James Sandry again!

Based on the hairstyle and dress, I’m putting this image into the 1870s. Clothing styles and hairstyles changed drastically between the 1860s and 1870s. Skirts were not the full bell shape over cage crinolines, but instead smooth fronted and draped to the rear end, in the early bustle look. Pads and small pillows were added under the skirt to emphasize the lady’s backside. Hairstyles no longer accented a nice wide face, but instead added height and angularity. This lady shows us her lovely purple tie – hand painted by the photographer – and even has rather large earrings. Her bodice is called a basque waist as it lays overtop of the skirt in a separate piece, rather than the two pieces being sewn together into one dress. The photographers were William James Sandry and E. Sandry this time.

Family time

Family time

J Earl

Howard Nicholls, photographer

This photograph is a cabinet card, turned into the landscape orientation to capture the entire family. As was common, the photograph was made out of doors so natural light could be used for the best exposure. I’d put this image in the late 1880s or very early 1890s based on the sleeve shapes of the women’s dresses. These are possibly Pascoe family members of the Cornwall Pascoes, who sailed to the US in 1856 to settle in Michigan and later Kansas in the 1870s. Jim says the family kept in touch, and clearly some of these images predate the settlement in Kansas. Others may be family who exchanged photos during the Michigan settlement. I found nothing at all on the photographer Howard Nicholls of Redruth.

While I’m afraid I did  not find anything more detailed about the photographers, such as dates of operation, I am hopeful that the general dates based on clothing are helpful for Jim. Sometimes, that is all it takes, knowing certain people are included or excluded based on the photo date. Good luck, Jim, in your search for answers to the family photographic mysteries!

 

 

 

Scrolled borders

Mounted Tin Types 13 W

Nice goatee and pink cheeks

Mounted Tin Types 11 W

Striped bodice and bow

These two tintype photos share the same scrolled border as our last photo of the middle aged woman, and for that reason I suspect they were made by the same photographer, and are family. I can’t decide of they are married or siblings, however. What is your opinion?

Mounted Tin Types 13 Back W Mounted Tin Types 11 Back W

 

Here are the backmarks of these two photos. T. M. Saurman at the corner of Main & Green Streets in Norristown, PA was a young photographer in 1870, just 23.

Thomas M. Saurman was a busy man! Born in about 1846, in 1860 he was living with his mother and family in Norristown, PA. One of the people living in the home was Frederick Spane, a painter, and someone who’s name comes up as an artist & photographer in the Norristown area. It is possible Saurman learned his trade from Spane or was inspired by him.

In 1870, Saurman was married to Eliza Davis (married in 1867) and they had a child Mary V born about 1870, as well as Eliza’s brother Charles Davis living with them.

The 1880 census is a bit sparse on information, showing Thomas living with his mother Catherine, along with his brother Othenel, aged 26, and they are both photographers. Also listed is Mary, age 17 and daughter in law to Catherine, as well as James, a 7 month old, listed as son of the head of household, which was Catherine. Maybe he was actually Mary’s child. It’s difficult to sort.

Finally, the 1900 census shows Thomas at age 55 still a photographer, his wife Eliza at age 53, daughters Mary age 30, Edith age 26, Norma age 15 and Mable age 12. Son Louis age 24 was a photographer and James age 22 was a druggist.

Here’s some more of the fun stuff. Thomas Saurman was awarded three patents. First was a print cutting apparatus in 1872. Next was a method to improve the drying of photographic plates in 1874. Finally was an improvement to a tobacco smoking pipe in 1902. Further, his son James was in the news for his pharmacology work.

Next time, another Saurman photo with a different card that will have you saying “awww.”

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