Little boy

Young master

Young master

Today let’s take a quick look at this young fellow. He is aged approximately 8 years old and was named James. You can just see it in pencil, written below the oval. It is a shame that whoever wrote that didn’t include his surname. There also is not a photographer’s backmark, and while it was included in the lot of photos including the Saurman and Lovejoy images, I cannot do more than assume this fellow is somehow related to those people. Alas, it doesn’t matter as only one of the bunch was identified and she continues to be a mystery.

Pink bow tie

Mounted Tin Types 7 W

Is this a repeat subject?

Mounted Tin Types 7 Back W

Lovejoy’s Studio mark

This tintype photograph looks remarkably like the fellow we saw back before the holidays, who had his portrait done by T. M. Saurman. The resemblance is strong, so it’s either the same man or his brother. This photograph features some hand tinting on the bowtie, making it pink. The backmark shows that this image was made at Lovejoy’s at 429 North Second Street, Above Willow, Philadelphia PA. I found a match to C. L. Lovejoy who was apparently known for his exquisite hand coloring work! He was known to be in business during the 1870s, however I must point out that the corners of this card have been cut and that is typical of 1860s cards. It is possible he bought these cards right at the end of the 60s or bought out old stock from another photographer. In January 1870, Lovejoy was the outgoing president of the Ferrotypers Association of Philadelphia – ferrotypes being another name for tintypes.

Check back again for another Lovejoy image next time!

 

I promise, I’m happy!

Mounted Tin Types 4 W

Mounted Tin Types 4 Back W

 

This is Grandmother Ridge, Caroline Elizabeth Ridge – Jane Bucks’ mother. She looks a bit like she doesn’t trust the photographer. I did find a Caroline Ridge, married to James Ridge, living in Maryland during the 1850 census, and one of their children was named Jane.

James Ridge (about 1809)

Caroline (about 1814)

Riley (about 1829)

Silas (about 1789)

Jane (about 1835)

Elizabeth (about 1837)

Merrit (about 1841)

Susan (about 1843)

Caroline (about 1848)

James (1850)

James the elder, Riley and Elizabeth were listed as farmers. Of course, I cannot be certain this is the correct family of Caroline Ridge pictured.

 

 

Another possible Saurman?

Big bonnet

Big bonnet

Today’s photograph is a tintype in an embossed card holder virtually identical to the one of our previous baby. The only difference I can find – outside of the quality of the embossing – is that this paper sleeve┬áhas the mark “Patent Applied For” while the baby photo does not. This particular photo does not have the T. M. Saurman mark covering the back of the tintype, and so I cannot know for sure if that is who made it.

The woman in the photograph is showing off quite a lot of her finery. A wide collar, golden brooch, sheer shawl, fancy bonnet and a veil folded to the back. In the past, I would have immediately assumed the veil was indicative of mourning. However, in my recent exposure to some 19th century clothing experts, I learned that veils were worn as a type of sun block. The veil, often in black and dark green, muted the brightness of the sun and allowed the wearer to more comfortably walk in the sun. This veil appears to have some type of lace pattern on it. The dress, collar and bonnet all are 1850s fashions, but I believe this is an 1860s image. Whether it was reproduced after the fact (I don’t think so) or she liked these clothes (more likely) we cannot really know. It is a lovely image with fine hand tinting on her cheeks and the brooch is delicately gilded as well.

Softly falling jowls and a wardrobe malfunction

Mounted Tin Types 2 W

Is her dress coming open here?

A nice tintype of an older lady, maybe in her 50s? I have heard a lot of talk lately about tintypes adding years to a person’s face, so unless I see actual age signs, I’m a bit hesitant to guess. However, this lady does have the drooping eyelids and softly falling jowls of middle age.

From what I can see of her dress, it is a gathered front bodice with dropped shoulder seams, putting the dress in the 1860s. Unless my eyes are deceiving me, it looks like the front opening of the dress has popped open a smidge, showing a glimpse of the white undergarments or lining.

I read a little bit about dating tintypes in paper sleeves, and while I am confident this image is from the 1860s, I’m not certain as to what part. There was a style of paper sleeve called a cartouche that was popular until about 1865. The cartouche was characterized by an oval opening and decorative motifs around the opening. What makes me uncertain about this one is that the motifs are in the corners of the card. I’m not well versed enough in 1860s cartouche sleeves to know if that is exactly what this is. But, I’m leaning toward the second half of the 60s, or even the very end of the 60s. The card itself is CDV sized to fit with the popular styles of the time.

The style of motifs correspond with some other images I found in the same lot, so I am going to assume they were made by the same photographer, which was T. M. Saurman in Morristown, PA. My research into Saurman confuses me further on dating this particular image. He was found in the 1870 census to be only 23 years old. Could he have been in business in 1865 at only 18 years old? I find that unlikely. So this is probably not a cartouche in the style that was popular until about 1865, but an updated version for the use of photographic artists who made tintypes well until the 1900s. More on T. M. Saurman in my next post! Don’t go away.

 

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