Top hat, bowler hat, slicked hair

Gem Hats 2 W

More fabulous hats

Here is the second page of the wonderful Haberdasher book and just look at these wonderful chapeaux! The one at top right has the look of a top hat, but I believe it might be a high bowler. Frankly, I don’t know much about men’s hats…ladies bonnets, now I could talk for a while on those! I shall have to do some research on these toppers to find out more about them. Anyone who knows more is welcome to comment! Note that while all three hats shown have a dip in the center front, the men each wear their hat to their best advantage, and thereby result in a different bit of flair. Top left looks a bit dour, top right looks formal and lower right looks dapper. Not to be left out, lower left looks very glossy. Hair was handled so very differently by 19th century people than it is today! Hair oil was encouraged so the shiny hair would look healthy. Can you just imagine running your fingers through that hair? I sure can’t. Ick.

Click the images below for a bit more detail.

Gem Hats 2 TL Gem Hats 2 TR Gem Hats 2 BL Gem Hats 2 BR

Edmund Tomkins

Edmund Tomkins W

Uncle Edmund

Edmund Tomkins back W

Lucy & Emily’s Dad

Today’s photograph is of Uncle Edmund Tomkins, either from America or who went to America. Uncle Edmund is sporting a rather wispy beard and mustache that makes me think there is an unfortunate scratch or blemish on the surface of the image. He must have been proud of it to wear it for his photograph, but in my book, this is not something to memorialize.

According to the back of the card, Uncle Edmund was also Lucy & Emily’s Dad. He may also be related to our previous subject, Uncle Taylor from Sheffield, as the handwriting on the backs is the same. They don’t look at all similar in their facial features, so possibly are in-law uncles or from opposite sides of the family. We can never know.

The photographer selected by Uncle Edmund was Helsby & Co, 34 Church Street in Liverpool, England.

In remembrance

Isa W

Striped bow tie

 

Isa back W

A memorial card?

From Gloucester, England we have a portrait of an older gentleman photographed by S. S. Soley. Someone inscribed on the back “In Remembrance of 17th Oct 70.” The date could possibly be 12th or something else, there seems to be an extra scratch of ink and it looks like a 4 upside down or an H. Regardless, this image can be fairly well dated to 1870, which was possibly the date of death of the man pictured on the front.

 

Bowler

Bowler W

Bowler, mustache and wavy hair

Today’s CDV shows us a later 19th century image of a handsome man, posed in front of a faux baluster. These types of scenes were designed to set the mood as pastoral, elegant, and otherwise affluent. He is wearing a fine coat, buttoned only at the top. This is a known style for menswear in certain periods of the era. He also has a neckcloth and vest visible beneath his coat, and even a chain for his watch just visible at mid torso. I particularly like his wavy hair, so I’m happy he chose to hold his bowler hat instead of wear it! Also notice his mustache, a fine specimen if ever there was one.

Bowler back W

Birtles, Northwich and Knutsford

The photographer who made the image was T. Birtles of Northwich and Knutsford.

 

Uncle Charles

Top Hat W

Top Hat back

 

Up for your perusal today is Uncle Charles from Liverpool. I like his shiny top hat and well buffed shoes. They look to be a low boot with elastic insets to allow it over the foot. Elastic was invented in the 1820s by Thomas Hancock and his collaboration with Charles Macintosh led to the production of rubberized overcoats, among other things. Hancock finally patented his rubber processing machine in 1837 and became the leading producer of rubber goods in the world. Elastic was used in boots and shoes extensively, both in men’s and women’s fashions.

The photographer Uncle Charles used was Harry Emmens of 30 Church Street and 108 Seel Street, Liverpool. By the studio appointments, I’m guessing this CDV was made in the 1880s or 1890s. Stay tuned for more photos from this family. Someone at some point identified a few of them, but I haven’t had a chance to try to track anyone down yet…if I can at all.

This is a Sepia Saturday submission! Click through and explore as they did in times past, up the lazy river, around the bend and across the great oceans.

Take a tour of the world

Fred Taylor

Fred Taylor W

Fred Taylor leans on a chair

This CDV shows a man with fine whiskers, a fine coat and bow tie, clean if rumpled suit of clothes, and brogan style shoes, leaning his hand upon the back of a chair. I originally thought this photo was interesting but it didn’t really catch my eye. However, I took note of the weight of the pink paper it is mounted upon. This paper is slightly thicker than gift tissue paper, slightly finer than printer paper. It is quite delicate and I have not seen its like before now. What also caught my eye as I scanned the photo is that the lower edge of the photo was lifting slightly.

What mystery did it reveal, you ask? Take a look for yourself.

The man, revealed

The man, revealed

There in the corner on the back of the photo itself, is the name. Fred Taylor. I can’t tell you more than that, for as you can probably see the photo lacks a backmark or any photographer’s information. It came in the batch from England, but beyond that…. Fred remains a mystery.

 

Pink bow tie

Mounted Tin Types 7 W

Is this a repeat subject?

Mounted Tin Types 7 Back W

Lovejoy’s Studio mark

This tintype photograph looks remarkably like the fellow we saw back before the holidays, who had his portrait done by T. M. Saurman. The resemblance is strong, so it’s either the same man or his brother. This photograph features some hand tinting on the bowtie, making it pink. The backmark shows that this image was made at Lovejoy’s at 429 North Second Street, Above Willow, Philadelphia PA. I found a match to C. L. Lovejoy who was apparently known for his exquisite hand coloring work! He was known to be in business during the 1870s, however I must point out that the corners of this card have been cut and that is typical of 1860s cards. It is possible he bought these cards right at the end of the 60s or bought out old stock from another photographer. In January 1870, Lovejoy was the outgoing president of the Ferrotypers Association of Philadelphia – ferrotypes being another name for tintypes.

Check back again for another Lovejoy image next time!

 

Previous Older Entries

%d bloggers like this: